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USA:  "When there is an extreme power imbalance, people—particularly women—are vulnerable to slavery."

USA: "When there is an extreme power imbalance, people—particularly women—are vulnerable to slavery."

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by IDWFED published Jun 08, 2017 12:00 AM
Last month an article entitled “My Family's Slave,” published in the magazine The Atlantic, went viral on social media in the US and Philippines. The article was written by a man whose family enslaved a domestic worker for decades.

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Last month an article entitled “My Family’s Slave,” published in the magazine The Atlantic, went viral on social media in the US and Philippines.


Photo: The Atlantic (Screen capture)

The article was written by a man whose family enslaved a domestic worker for decades. The domestic worker, Eudocia Tomas Pulido, raised and cared for the author’s mother, the author and his siblings, while enduring the horrific abuse of forced labor. The story has gone viral, and reaching a broad audience. This is a tremendous opportunity for us as a movement to put the stories of survivors of trafficking front and center, and to engage more people in pushing for the policy solutions that we know all domestic workers need.

NDWA responded to the article with an OpEd in The Atlantic written by our Direcotr, Ai-jen Poo entitled, “Lola Wasn’t Alone: Slavery Persists in Homes Across America,” shining a light on how common trafficking is in domestic work and what survivors are doing to end it. “When there is an extreme power imbalance, people—particularly women—are vulnerable to slavery.”

Despite laws on the books for a hundred years, slavery and human trafficking still exist in the United States. NDWA’s Beyond Survival Campaign seeks to build the capacity of NDWA affiliates and their communities to respond to the human trafficking of domestic workers. Through worker-led organizing that links human trafficking to worker rights, immigrant rights, gender equity and racial justice, we are working to end human trafficking in the U.S. and around the world.

Beyond Survival developed a screening tool that can be used to identify someone who might be a survivor of labor trafficking. Additionally, this March, the Beyond Survival campaign released its newest report, The Human Trafficking of Domestic Workers: Findings from the Beyond Survival Campaign.

Domestic work represents the largest segment of reported labor trafficking cases in the United States. The majority female workforce, the isolation of the work, combined with harsh immigration policies and the extreme economic pressure on poor women leave far too much room for those who seek to take advantage, to do so.  

Source: My Family’s Slave

Story Type: Story

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